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, and everything, they give big tax breaks for the oil companies. the big manufacturers. they're taking jobs away from us. and why they think it is best to do that. i need an answer to that, because i work 40 years of my life, and now i'm disabled. and now they're talking about cutting everything. i just don't think -- i've even put my life on the line for this country, vietnam. why they think it's the right thing to do. host: thanks for your call. next up, a comment from hewitt, texas. tony, a republican there. good morning. caller: good morning. how's everybody there this morning? host: it's a little hot both temperature-wise and internally i think here. caller: yeah. you know, we deal with a few facts here this morning. that cut, cap and balance that was passed did two things that everybody just is totally bent out of shape about. one of which is that it would raise the debt ceiling, and we would give that community organizer everything he wanted. it also, at the time, would say that the united states would even have a downgrade in its debt rating. and what do we do? well, you got the presiden
between himself and michele bachmann. >> big difference between talking and getting stuff done. and i get stuff done. >> it's the latest chantner the rivalry of the two minnesota candidates for the republican presidential nomination, which boiled over yesterday, with pawlenty having spent almost two weeks saying bachmann has no congressional accomplishments to speak of, bachmann had enough. in a sunday statement, she fired back saying "i've fought against irresponsible spending while governor pawlenty was leading a multimillion dollar budget mess in minnesota." later the bachmann campaign added on healthcare mandates, climate change and wall street bail-outs there's very little daylight between governor pawlenty's record and the obama administration's." this back and forth comes with pawlenty still trailing bachmann in the polls. for bachmann, the verbal sparring seems to come with at least some risk. it will likely draw even more attention to the iowa straw poll, less than three weeks away, and pawlenty seems to have the advantage of a larger, deeper iowa organization. the straw poll bal
savings, those are probably phony but here the important thing, no tax increases this is a big development in this budget story. [ talking over each other ] >> neil: you are making the assumption that there isn't an add-oncoming. you are right, the deal itself, [ talking over each other ] >> neil: don't jump the again. more than a trillion coming out of the wars. republicans have factored in that math as well. do you think given your point of view, that others will jump onboard of as the best thing out there? >> i think this is the basis for a deal. we have to jiggle the numbers, you are right. a lot of numbers in reid's budget proposal are phony. i think it is significant. weeks ago, harry reid put forward a budget with two trillion of tax increases, now he's at zero, that's a big deal. >> neil: we've been mentioning the markets and how they've held on. is that because they are factoring in a deal at the last minute or that they are okay, no matter what happens? >> i think the market has come to the perception we will have a deal. i think we are going to get a deal within 48 hours of augu
said it was going to -- said it was going to. here's why it's such a big problem. because of speaker boehner, he said there's one major principle, you'll remember, jessica, as they moved forward to raise the debt ceiling, that the amount of the cuts be greater than the amount they raised the debt ceiling. and in this legislation right now is called for raising the debt ceiling by $900 billion, $850 billion, is less than $900 billion, so know that's a problem. policy aides are scrambling to try to rewrite the legislation to make their way forward. we know they're aiming for a vote tomorrow, but we don't know if they can promise it quite yet. we got a speaker from speaker boehner's spokesman, this coming from michael steele, in response, in reaction to the cbo, michael steele said we're here to change washington, no more spoke and mirrors or phantom cuts. we promised we'd cut more than the debt ceiling. as we speak, congressional, are looking at options to rewrite the legislation to meet our pledge. this is what can happen when you have an actual plan and submit all it really seemed to
for the tabloids. host: what about the broadsheets? guest: it is known occasionally. there was a big scandal about mp's expenses last year, which came from information that is the voice of -- information that is the will serve and got on a computer disk. my newspaper paid for that because they thought it was in the public interest. that is a rare instance of a broadsheet paper paying for information. for the tabloids, we call it checkbook journalism. salacious information about a night out on the town with a celebrity or pop star or encounters with celebrities. that culture has grown and become more insidious over the past 20 or 30 years. host: how would you describe, to help put it in perspective -- by the way, we will put the numbers on the screen as we continue this conversation about the phone hacking investigation in the u.k. prime minister cameron spoke this morning at a problem about it and we carry that live on c- span -- spoke this morning in parliament about it and we carry that live on c-span2. we carry rupert murdoch and rebekah brooks yesterday and we will speak about that. how do you
industries a mindless handout. the big oil companies getting a handout. it's much easier to retain that benefit and it's very difficult to save medicare. it's a simple majority that can end medicare. many of us go home every week, others as frequently as they can because of the distance they have to travel to get to their districts, and we're greeted by signs like this. hands off my medicare. and it's no wonder because what we've seen yesterday was the third attempt in this few months of the 112th congress, to end medicare. three votes, one with a republican study committee, one with the ryan plan, the path to prosperity which we have redesignated the road to ruin and yesterday with the cut, slash, and burn attempt. i won't get into the nomenclature because it's inappropriate and misrepresenting what would really happen. yesterday we had a vote on this floor to make it easy to end medicare and easy to maintain handouts to the oil company. when we look at the dollars that are saved by ending medicare, we see where they somehow are transitioned over to tax cuts that are maintained fo
procedure, the regular order but have attempted to solve this big problem in secret, behind closed doors with just a few people. i believe that is contrary to the historical understanding of the role of congress and i'm not happy about it, i oppose it and i object to it and i expect an appropriate amount of time to consider whatever plan comes >> with titles like "slander," and coulter has something to say. now, your chance to talk to the best-selling author. in death, for three hours starting at noon on both tv. >> the former u.s. comptroller general david walker of the nation pose a growing debt and budget deficit challenges. from "washington journal,", this is 30 minutes. the former u.s. comptroller general and now founder and ceo of the comeback american initiative, david walker print a good morning. forve said it is a bad idea the congress and president to flirt, so to speak, with the august 2nd deadline of hitting a possible debt default. what do you think is going on right now and are concerned there is not a deal in place yet? guest: i am concerned. if everybody is true to their
saying, only a long-term option here? >> the president believes that we have to think big and act big, because as i mentioned before, there have been events and decisions that have led us to this point and they include the terrible recession, the worst since the great depression we went through. the fact that because congress wouldn't act, he apointed the commission and they delivered a report. we have the outside report. and we have the president's framework he put forward and the republican budget that passed the house, all of which describe a problem and a solution in generally the same terms. the big exception is three to one, they propose solutions that demand a balanced approach which the president supports. this is not the kind of situation that comes around very frequently and the president believes that it is worth the inevitable political difficulty making tough choices creates to get this done for the american people, for the american economy. so he does not share the view, does not believe it is wise to pursue a short-term solution that essentially would be kicking the can
big things done, we can -- washington can still get big things done. this is about continuing to have a strong economy and continuing to compromise and take maybe a couple chapters out of tip o'neil, bob michael, ronald reagan, president clinton, people that have served in this town with distinction and gotten big things done through compromise. >> jay? >> some house republicans said that they've already compromised and that's what the boehner bill is, it is a compromise. >> well, i'm going to let jay -- >> oh, come on! >> i'm going to let jay do his job here. i'm not here to take his job. i'm here to try and put forth a message that in one of the highest unemployment sectors in the country, where we have friends and neighbors all over the country that are out of work during the construction season, they ought to go back to work. they shouldn't be held hostage. these projects shouldn't be held hostage, and we have 4,000 faa employees through no -- hardworking people that come to work every day and do their jobs. >> can you explain what the bottleneck is on the faa bill, from your pers
. there's supposedly meetings between the white house and senate and big game players later this beak. in erms the of a deal we're getting a real date, not necessarily august 2nd, but july 22nd. why? there's a ten-day period needed for the congressional budget office to score any type of compromise as well as you're going to have to sell this compromise to the members. house republicans have been steadfast they don't want any tax increases to consider any type of compromise. speaker boehner needs some time to sell that to his members. >> you're talking about political high ground. you're not talking about the substance. i want to ask you about libya. there is a procedural vote the first step on the kerry-minnesota cane resolution on libya what do you see there? >> it's around 5:30 p.m. today. it really is a procedural vote on the mccain-kerry libya resolution which says for one year the u.s. should allow -- there should be force in libya, u.s. backed force with no ground troops. to one democratic aide said they really don't know how this vote the going to come come out. there is specu
do if they had a lot of time. they don't have a lot of time right now. >> that's the big question and the big factor at the center of all of this. they don't have a lot of time and they need to move both of these through both chambers of congress and somehow reconcile them, how they're going to do that. >> let me go back to the white house. it looks like these two plans, they're obviously a senate plan by majority leader harry reid and house plan by speaker john boehner. does the white house feel sidelined or left out of thf process? >> i had this question, too, and i talked with one official who said the president can't be sidelined. he is the president. he has the power of the veto pen. he's the one who says ultimately if something moves. although inthe thought is if he was given a plan that could get through congress, i think the thought is how could he do anything but sign it? but certainly the president and the white house have been very much in touch with senate democrats and the roll right now is that senate majority leader harry reid is pretty much the president's lifeline
as 40,000 dead in the last four years. this shocking reality has made it's way on the big screen with a new genre called narco movies. in this movie called "high-powered people," a drug lord and an associate discuss alliances. the violence in their movies pales in comparison to reality. >> translator: we're not even close to reflecting reality. can you call our movies soft because we don't show as much blood and killings. we just try to give people what they want. >> reporter: the english translation of the movie titles are very revealing. the bough so the film makers say they make sure the screen plays don't rub any of the cartels the wrong way, and it's a kinds of self censorship that keeps them safe. >> translator: we deal with these issues in the best way possible. we're not afraid they will come after us because we behave. we do things the best we can and so far we have not been threatened by anybody. >> rafael romo joins me now. is anybody concerned about the glorification of what the cartels are all about? >> there is great concern. the movies are not yet mainstream in mex
forward to reduce the deficit in a big way modeled after these bipartisan commissions, where there's been pretty good bipartisan agreeme agreement. but efforts to forge a grand compromise, bringing the deficit down by $4 trillion, have been abandoned by republican leaders over and over. i -- i have not supported every detail in these grand compromise efforts. i don't want to do anything to undermine medicare or social security or medicaid, programs that have worked for generations now and programs that millions of ohioans depend on, for middletown to ashtaboula to toledo and gallipolis. that's because i wanted a more balanced approach. i know the presiding officer did too. but as days and weeks and weeks and months go by, we're now only days away from default. we're simply running out of time. that's what the senate bill is about, protecting us from default. the spirit of continued compromise again, the majority leader has come forth with a plan to reduce the deficit by $2.2 trillion. it's truly a compromise because it meets the republicans' main criteria, it contains spending cuts to rou
: we have to look at the overall big picture. there are going to be times -- you can only spend more than you make for so long and it catches up to you and that is what is happening right now the bank there going to be situations, i imagine, with the federal government has to take out loans and borrow money. but this has been going on for years and years and years. and you cannot continue to do this. if we do not get our fiscal house in order, get our credit -- that our creditors will take control and do it for us. i am not sure that we want that. host: we of gone from a trillion dollar debt to $14 trillion, but is there good debt for the government? someone argues that student loans and mortgages are good debt, and bad debt would be loans for vacations or fancy cars. guest: i do not think any debt is good. it is probably a more acceptable form of debt. but again, i say that there are probably going to be instances, but the problem is when it becomes everything that you -- when you have so much debt that it is overwhelming to everything else, when you have more debt if you can pay. a
. [ jack ] yeah, ts is pretty good. don't you have a big race today? don't worry, kevin, i've got it all covered. (cheering crowd) track announcer: and jamie mcmurray wins the brickyard 400. how'd we do? announcer: check out huge clearance savings at bass pro shops and our upcoming fall hunting classic. he was all like "oh no, i cannot do investing." next thing you know he's got a stunning portfolio. shhhh, you're welcome. [ male announcer ] e-trade. investing unleashed. >> all right. glad you're up. the debt ceiling deadline quickly approaching. we're less than one week away from possible default. so how will washington come together on a solution before tuesday's deadline? will they at all? former advisor to president bill clinton and author of "revolt" dick morris now joins us. dick, i know you have a lot to say about this and how this is all playing out. first off, as for the president, is this drama working for him? >> no. no, it's working against him. ultimately, whenever washington is a mess, it's the president that gets blamed for it. now, of course, republicans in congress get
is not for light or transient reasons. it's a big, big deal when the united states government has been for months and will continue to be borrowing about 40% of every dollar we spend, running up the largest deficits the nation has ever seen. and so what the law says, that -- the law and the united states code says you should have a budget. and when you set a budget, you take all of the bills that are out there and tell them how much money they have to spend so your total amount of money at the end does not exceed a dangerous level for the c. that's whac -- for the country. that's what a budget does. and so we're going to seek and repeatedly call to this senate's attention that we got the cart before the horse. we're spending money without a budget and we're going to have to have a budget, else we are not in control of our spending. and once you have a budget, it takes 60 votes to violate the budget. you can kind of stick to it if you make up your mind to do so. and we don't have to violate it and burst the budget. so that's -- that's what we're talking about today and it's a matter of great serio
, but it means, mr. president, that we can't be raising taxes on the job creators, and there is a big debate right now about how do we get ourselves out of this fiscal mess. i would submit to my colleagues that the real issue here is spending. if you go back to the foundation of our country, the year 1800, we were only spending 2% of our entire economic output on the government, the federal government. this year we're going to spend 24% to 25%. the historical average over the past 40 years is about 20.6%. we are dramatically higher in terms of what we are spending on our federal government as a percentage of our entire economy. to me, clearly, we don't have a revenue issue here in washington. we have a spending issue. which would suggest that we ought to get after spending, after federal spending, particularly spending that is -- is duplicative, redundant, there are so many things in the federal government that we spend money on that we need to get that waste and that -- and all those types of wasteful spending out of our spending here in washington, d.c., but we also have to focus on those
, was part of another big debate over federal spending. and out of that came the graham-hollings legislation. we talked to him on camera. here's just a clip of his comments on washington today. >> nothing gets done. the atmosphere is the game. the game is re-election. you've got to get the money for re-election. in other words in 1998, 12 years ago, i had to spend -- i had to raise, excuse me, $8.5 million. now, $8.5 million is $30,000 every week, each week for six years. it's not just raising money the year ahead. it's raising it for all six years. and you're raising it not only for yourself because your colleagues will help you, the committees will want to keep that seat. so when your time is up. so you are always out there raising money. and the name of the game is make no mistake, play the fence when you get back to washington. got no idea of paying the bill. they haven't paid the bill for 10 years. host: fritz hollings will be 90 later this year. expressing his frustration. he's part of the many voices we will include in our "charleston weekend" on "book tv" and "american history tv." a
the c. and he appeared to be picking up the votes. lesson to shawn duffy. >> is this as big as we wanted to go? heck, no. we wanted to go bigger. we ran on going bigger. but this is the only proposal on the table that accomplishes the goals that we set out to do. >> progress but apparently and this is why we have such a drama unfolding on capitol hill, not enough progress. the speaker is still short the votes. he's delayed the key vote, a key vote to not only if you are sitting at home, maybe you think the debt ceiling should be raised, maybe you should, it's a fundamentally important political showdown, some people think the speaker's hold on his job could be in jeopardy if he loses this vote. let's go to kate bolduan, do they believe they can twist enough arms to get enough votes to pass this tonight? >> reporter: fabulous question this evening and one that is very hard to answer at this moment. i can tell you, let me just give you the lay of the land what you can probably see a little bit of, john, you were talking about the speaker's office, it's right down the hallway, what we're se
abduction is very big. that is why we know about the case the anthony case and trial. what are we trying to accomplish? are we trying to feed a market and have our cameras in the courtroom to satisfy the public. the purposes are you going to get to the right place. if you're concerned about transparency and secrecy, everyone has mentioned a variety of things that need to happen. we have did be really careful about there is cameras in the court room which is really about transparency. >> we should not ignore the demise of the traditional newspaper and the beat reporter. he is long gone. before long, newspapers will be gone. >> are the speakers on in the aisles? the microphones. we will find a good question out there for the panel. you need to go for a microphone and make sure they are on. >> maryland is the only state that has an absolute statued -- statutory bar on the protests coverage of criminal trials. the antecedent of that was a case in the 1920's presided over by a famous judge. the advantage of an absolute bar is found in the fact that same and money are hydraulic courses. once a
the standard cost-benefit analysis rules. this affects our economy in big ways. it affects jobs and our ability to get this economy back on track. closing this independent agency loophole is a reform that those of us on both sides of the aisle should join the president in supporting. this is the right vehicle to be able to achieve that. no major regulation whatever its source, should be imposed on american employers or or on state and local governments without a serious consideration of what the costs are what the benefits are and whether there is available a less burdensome alternative to achieve the same objective. this amendment moves us closer toward that goal. it's a commonsense amendment again, taking the president's executive order and memorandum of today and actually putting it into force through the force of law. thank you mr. president. i yield the floor and i note the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: the presiding officer: without objection. mr. whitehouse: than
senate procedure, the regular order but have attempted to solve this big problem in secret, behind closed doors with just a few people. i believe that is contrary to the historical understanding of the role of congress and i'm not happy about it, i oppose it a i object to it and i expect an appropriate amount of time to consider whatever plan comes ded women like them guard these hallowed halls. mr. president, some of those dedicated police officers stood guard saturday and sunday as we worked to reach an agreement to avert a default on our national debt. leaders from both parties were here throughout the weekend. differences still separate our two sides but work toward an agreement continues. this afternoon, i will put on the floor a proposal to -- that i hope will break that impasse. this legislation would put to rest the specter of default. it would cut $2.7 trillion from the deficit over the next decade. it would not raise any new revenue or make any cuts to medicare, medicaid or social security. all the cuts included in this package have previously been supported by republicans. the
, it absolutely matters for economic development. and people in big cities might make fun of small airports, that they don't have all the -- all the hustle and bustle, but we do know that medium sized and smaller airports matter a great deal. with the refusal of the house to take up a clean extension of f.a.a., more than 4,000 employees have been furloughed, dozens of construction projects have come to a halt. in this economy, for some radicals in the house of representatives to decide because they have got a political mission and an ideology that doesn't quite fit with the majority of americans, they are going to again hold hostage something that just simply needs to be done, and that is what's called reauthorization of f.a.a. this many employees have been furloughed for who knows how long. senator rockefeller said some may look elsewhere for jobs. these are very skilled technicians and engineers and others. and what it means to these construction projects. f.a.a. helps to pay all over the country for modernization of airports, and we have all heard stories. i don't recall that i have ever
and they count on washington, not always to take care of everything but take care of the big things like making sure we don't default on our obligations. he needed to talk to the american people, to those americans who haven't been paying close attention where this stands and why it is so important and why the risk is there that if congress doesn't act and we believe it will, something that has never happened before in our history could happen and it would be very bad indeed. that's why he had to address the country and why he wanted to explain to them his view, that compromise is so necessary. >> one other quick thing. i think on cbs radio this morn dan pfeiffer said if congress does not act by august 2nd this could lead to a depression. is this your position, that we might have a depression in america? >> depression, what i know, what, economic experts have said is that, and again, republican and democrat, jim baker, ronald reagan, all sorts, have said that a default on our obligations would produce an economic calamity. how that, how you demean that obviously depend on how long it lasts and
essentially go to another country and export through that country, put on, for example, "made in korea" -- big implications with these trade agreements -- and end up shipping those goods to the united states. and senator blunt and his constituents have made the correct point that that's, again, taking away jobs from middle-class folks. but we have got to get back here on the floor of the united states senate to the issue of jobs. that's the most important question for our constituents, madam president. staff told me on the way over here that a recent survey of businesses cites again their number-one concern, that sales are going down in their stores. and i think everybody here in the senate knows you can often go to a store on a weekend or an evening and you see hardly anybody there because middle-class people are very worried about what's ahead and simply because of these economic times do not have the money to go in and buy those goods and arrange for those services that in an economy that requires they be in the marketplace, they simply don't have the resources for it. so i hope my colleagu
couldn't get along well enough in those days to spend more money on big programs. there was legislation that was passed that supported in a bipartisan way by president clinton and republicans in congress to limit spending. so there was some spending restraint. but the reality is the last time we had our fiscal house in order and were spending less money than we were taking in was a time in which the economy was growing. if we really want to address the issue of balancing our budget, we should focus much more attention than we have on growing the economy, putting people to work and allowing as they work that the taxes will be collected. the greatest opportunity we have to improve people's lives is to create an environment in which jobs are created, in which employers feel comfortable in investing in the future and buying plant and equipment and putting people to work. and so while it's cut, cap and balance today, we need to make certain we don't forget, in my view, that fourth component: grow the economy. and in my view, that means a tax code that is certain and fair, that doesn't change
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tax cuts in 2001 and 2003 to the wealthy and big corporations, the so-called job creators, didn't create jobs in the private sector. indeed, only one million net new jobs were created between 2001 and 2009. all government jobs. the private sector reported minus 600,000 jobs. so much for giving tax breaks to the private job generators. some argue against all debt, but all debts aren't bad because all debts are not the same. a $50,000 gambling debt is bad because it has no return. the last decade shows that gambling on tax cuts for the rich to create jobs was bad. gambling on two wars and not paying for them was bad. gambling on a new prescription drug law that was unpaid for was horrible. and gambling on unregulated financial institutions that failed was bad. and they resulted in a housing market collapse, slow economic growth, high unemployment and huge deficits and debts, all bad. so i think we gambled enough on the theory that budget cuts and tax cuts generate private sector jobs and more taxes. the l-a-f-f-e-r is truly a laffer. republicans are right, we do have speaning prob
, adding jobs, and creating new opportunities. we are not seeing that, in part, because of the big overhang of foreclosed homes, which are weighing on prices. it is a vicious circle. people do not want to buy because prices are falling and prices are falling because people do not want to buy. there are a number of things we are doing. we are keeping mortgage rates globe. -- keeping mortgage rates low. this works to try to modify mortgages. i think it is worth looking at that area. one area where more work needs to be done is housing finance. we have not begun to clarify for the market out housing finance will be conducted in the future. another area i suggest he might think about is the overhang of distressed houses. for example, fanny, freddie, and the bank's own about half a million homes right now, which are basically sitting there on the market and which are pressing down prices and reducing appraisals and making the housing market much weaker than it otherwise would be. that is another area to look at. i agree with you that the housing market is, in some sense, the epicenter of the pro
the national debt or we can allow big spenders to lead us further down the road of chronic deficits and leave our children and grandchildren saddled with debt that is not our own. the choice is ours. the stakes are high. failure is not an option. the speaker pro tempore: the chair now recognizes the gentlewoman from wisconsin, ms. moore. for five minutes. ms. moore: thank you, mr. speaker. i ask unanimous consent to be able to add extraneous material. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. ms. moore: mr. speaker, i had breakfast this morning. i had granola and yogurt, a little fruit, egg and bacon sandwich, and i'm feeling irritable because i didn't have my coffee. and i'm looking forward to a delicious lunch that i planned at about noontime. but in the meantime, on the horn of africa, 11 million people are facing starvation and not because they're lazy people or unworthy people but because they're suffering from the biggest drought that they have seen in 60 years, because they're experiencing flooding, because there are people who stepped away from the loving care that we us
money to spend is no easy task. though his campaign team talks a big game about the popularity of tax increases, the president's own words suggest otherwise. last week in a shameful display of class warfare, the president did specifically call for some tax increases on the rich. that includes 800,000 small businesses, by the way, where 70% of the jobs come from. but that is the exception that proves the rule. by and large, the president avoids the effectual truth of his mission to get rid of tax expenditures. massive tax increases on the middle-class american families to whom he promised immunity from tax increases when he was running for president. instead he and other members of the party of tax stph-rss every day -- tax increases as spending through the tax code. how serious should we take his rhetoric? when the president said he wanted to address the nation's debt by reducing spending through the tax code, it proved too much for even john stewart. this was stewart's analysis of the president's contention that we could reduce the deficit by attacking spending through the tax code.
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)